New owner (some questions)

Hi guys!

I have my new Audi A3 1.5. DSG MHEV for a couple of weeks now and I absolutely love it!

I have a couple of questions.

1)While am driving and select to change manually the gears how I can set it back to automatic?
When I stop, I just put it to neutral (N) and then back to drive (D) and it changes to automatic, but don't know how to do it while am driving.

2) Do you know if there is a way to see the status of the battery and if I can adjust any settings on when the car goes into cruising mode (Turning the engine off while
driving). I feel like am damaging the engine and the battery when I don't press the pedal for the gas for a second, the engine turns off, and immediately I have to brake. As a result, the engine turns on again. This is like a 1-second process.
 

SillyGoose

Registered User
1. Pull the gear selector down when in manual and it will automatically put it in auto
2. Im not sure, but you can turn off the auto start stop function by pressing the button near the hazar lights
 
1. Pull the gear selector down when in manual and it will automatically put it in auto
2. Im not sure, but you can turn off the auto start stop function by pressing the button near the hazar lights
Thanks for the quick reply

1) Ok, thank you!
2) I noticed that works only when the car is stopped, not while driving.
 
1) Alternatively, hold the + gear change paddle on the steering wheel to cancel manual; or, if in D mode, after a little while the car should drop back into auto by itself. (The car only holds manual mode when Sports is selected.)

2) The car is designed to switch the engine on and off frequently. The motor-generator in the MHEV is much more powerful than a starter motor and is designed for this. Personally, I just let the car do what it is designed to do and don’t worry about it (and I’m an engineer who has every intention of keeping the car for a long time). If it really does concern you then try feathering the accelerator rather than releasing it completely; or put the car into sports mode.
 
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1) Alternatively, hold the + gear change paddle on the steering wheel to cancel manual; or, if in D mode, after a little while the car should drop back into auto by itself. (The car only holds manual mode when Sports is selected.)

2) The car is designed to switch the engine on and off frequently. The motor-generator in the MHEV is much more powerful than a starter motor and is designed for this. Personally, I just let the car do what it is designed to do and don’t worry about it (and I’m an engineer who has every intention of keeping the car for a long time). If it really does concern you then try feathering the accelerator rather than releasing it completely; or put the car into sports mode.

Thanks. I think I should enjoy it more and stop worrying.
 

KXL

Active Member
Remember not to enjoy it too much until you have 900 miles on the clock though (the run in period for the engine). Frustratingly, because of lockdown, I still have 400 miles to go despite having had the car since early March!
Oh I know this feeling....need to show so much restrain....want to be first off the lights, sorry, can't do that...want to overtake a large lorry on a single carriageway...sorry can't do that...haha!
 
My Audi rep told me not to worry about running the engine in. He said it's fitted with a software run-in program which automatically holds the engine back. I wouldn't worry to much.
That sounds more likely than what my dealer said: which is that Audi run the engines in on the bench (not true, at least not for A3’s).

However, both pieces of advice are in contradiction to the guidance on running in the engine on p104 of the A3 manual (Nov ‘20, English version). When it comes to a choice of what a rep says and what the manual says, I know which one I’m going to rely on.
 

KXL

Active Member
My Audi rep told me not to worry about running the engine in. He said it's fitted with a software run-in program which automatically holds the engine back. I wouldn't worry to much.
When I collected my previous car (Volvo V40), I asked the same Q, and the guy said, drive it normally and not like you stole it for the first month or so. If you need to increase speed quickly, just put your foot down the engine will be fine. Oh and from experience of two previous new cars from factory the first 1-2k miles (from experience) the fuel economy is not good, after which it would improve several mpg all things equal.

Also been told (or maybe read it somewhere on the handbook) that also try to vary the revs (engine braking inc), but don't go more than 2/3s the rpms (so no more than 4k) and constant fixed rpms highway driving for long period is not good for a run in. I mean I can live with going up to 4k in the first month....
 
When I collected my previous car (Volvo V40), I asked the same Q, and the guy said, drive it normally and not like you stole it for the first month or so. If you need to increase speed quickly, just put your foot down the engine will be fine. Oh and from experience of two previous new cars from factory the first 1-2k miles (from experience) the fuel economy is not good, after which it would improve several mpg all things equal.

Also been told (or maybe read it somewhere on the handbook) that also try to vary the revs (engine braking inc), but don't go more than 2/3s the rpms (so no more than 4k) and constant fixed rpms highway driving for long period is not good for a run in. I mean I can live with going up to 4k in the first month....
This is about the size of it. If you want to be extra careful for the first 1,000 miles, fair enough - I was with my BMW as I plan to keep it long-term. But really, the only really bad things you can do to a new engine are run it at the same revs for ages (think cruise control on the motorway) and/or over-work it when it's cold. I tend to stay clear from kickdown and launch control for the first 700-800 miles to be safe - but really it's about making sure the oil is heated through before you let the right foot get its way.
 

KXL

Active Member
This is about the size of it. If you want to be extra careful for the first 1,000 miles, fair enough - I was with my BMW as I plan to keep it long-term. But really, the only really bad things you can do to a new engine are run it at the same revs for ages (think cruise control on the motorway) and/or over-work it when it's cold. I tend to stay clear from kickdown and launch control for the first 700-800 miles to be safe - but really it's about making sure the oil is heated through before you let the right foot get its way.
Exactly why I want to collect the car myself, and not get it delivered by a driver, as I doubt (could be wrong) they would just take it gently (which is great) but on the highways I'm sure it would just be cruise control all the way.
 
Another question from me guys. Do you know what the 3 red lines mean?

IMG_20210512_211813.jpg
 

KXL

Active Member
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